Quick Answer: What Type Of Hysterectomy Is Best For Endometrial Hyperplasia?

When the lining of the uterus is thick?

Endometrial hyperplasia is a condition in which the endometrium (lining of the uterus) is abnormally thick.

There are four types of endometrial hyperplasia.

The types vary by the amount of abnormal cells and the presence of cell changes..

What is the best treatment for endometrial hyperplasia?

In many cases, endometrial hyperplasia can be treated with progestin. Progestin is given orally, in a shot, in an intrauterine device, or as a vaginal cream.

What type of hysterectomy is best for endometrial cancer?

A total hysterectomy with bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy is the removal of the uterus, cervix, fallopian tubes, and ovaries. This is the most common surgery done for endometrial cancer.

Should I have a hysterectomy for endometrial hyperplasia?

Women with atypical hyperplasia should undergo a total hysterectomy because of the risk of underlying malignancy or progression to cancer. A laparoscopic approach to total hysterectomy is preferable to an abdominal approach as it is associated with a shorter hospital stay, less postoperative pain and quicker recovery.

Can a thick uterine lining cause weight gain?

Endometriosis causes endometrial tissue, which usually lines the uterus, to develop outside of the uterus. It can cause chronic pain, heavy or irregular periods, and infertility. Some people also report weight gain and bloating.

How long before endometrial hyperplasia turns into cancer?

Unless you have taken hormones, which can cause it to grow faster, endometrial hyperplasia is slow growing. It takes ten to twelve years from the time it begins to grow for it to develop into endometrial cancer.

What is a significant early sign of endometrial carcinoma?

Most women with endometrial cancer have early symptoms. The most common symptom of endometrial cancer is abnormal uterine bleeding. For women who are premenopausal, this includes irregular menstrual bleeding, spotting, and bleeding between menstrual periods. For women who are postmenopausal, any bleeding is abnormal.

Where does endometrial cancer spread first?

The external iliac lymph nodes are most commonly involved pelvic lymph nodes in endometrial carcinoma, followed by the obturator and common iliac nodes.

Are there any other symptoms of endometrial hyperplasia Besides bleeding?

Symptoms of endometrial hyperplasia include abnormal vaginal bleeding, including bleeding or spotting between menstrual periods, dramatic changes in the duration of menstrual periods, postmenopausal bleeding, or heavier menstrual blood flow. In some instances, endometrial hyperplasia may precede cancer of the uterus.

Can I still get cancer after a total hysterectomy?

Yes, you still have a risk of ovarian cancer or a type of cancer that acts just like it (primary peritoneal cancer) if you’ve had a hysterectomy.

What percentage of endometrial biopsies are cancerous?

Many women who have symptoms of endometrial cancer (vaginal bleeding after menopause or abnormal menstrual bleeding) may have a biopsy that shows precancerous changes of the endometrium, called complex hyperplasia with atypia. Risk is high that 25 to 50 percent of these women will go on to develop endometrial cancer.

How do you know if you have endometrial hyperplasia?

Endometrial hyperplasia typically causes abnormal uterine bleeding and most commonly occurs in postmenopausal women. Additional symptoms include: Shorter menstrual cycles (less than 21 days) Bleeding during menstrual cycle that is heavier and longer than usual.

Can endometrial hyperplasia be seen on ultrasound?

When a patient presents with abnormal bleeding, ultrasound should be your go-to imaging modality to look for signs of endometrial hyperplasia.

What happens if my endometrial biopsy is abnormal?

Your doctor may perform a hysteroscopy with dilatation and curettage if the results of an endometrial biopsy are inconclusive or the doctor couldn’t obtain enough tissue for a biopsy. In this procedure, the doctor widens the opening of the cervix with thin, metal rods called dilators.

Can endometrial cancer come back after hysterectomy?

The chances of endometrial cancer recurrence vary based on a number of factors that are unique to each patient, including age and the stage and spread of the initial cancer. Endometrial cancer is most likely to recur in the first three years after the initial treatment, though late recurrence is also possible.

Can endometrial hyperplasia cause pain?

When endometrial hyperplasia symptoms occur, they usually involve pain during intercourse or various abnormalities of menstruation, including: Heavy menstruation. Bleeding between period or after menopause. Abnormally long periods.

How often does hyperplasia turn into cancer?

At 10 years after diagnosis, about 13 percent of women with atypical hyperplasia may develop breast cancer. That means for every 100 women diagnosed with atypical hyperplasia, 13 can be expetected to develop breast cancer 10 years after diagnosis. And 87 will not develop breast cancer.

What is the most common age to get endometrial hyperplasia?

In our study, among women 18–90 years the overall incidence of endometrial hyperplasia was 133 per 100,000 woman-years, was most common in women ages 50–54, and was rarely observed in women under 30. Simple and complex hyperplasia incidences peaked in women ages 50–54.

Can endometrial hyperplasia go away on its own?

Endometrial hyperplasia is an increased growth of the endometrium. Unlike a cancer, mild or simple hyperplasia can go away on its own or with hormonal treatment. The most common type of hyperplasia, simple hyperplasia, has a very small risk of becoming cancerous.

Is endometrial hyperplasia serious?

Endometrial hyperplasia is a condition of the female reproductive system. The lining of the uterus (endometrium) becomes unusually thick because of having too many cells (hyperplasia). It’s not cancer, but in certain women, it raises the risk of developing endometrial cancer, a type of uterine cancer.

Is 13mm endometrial thickness normal?

For ovulatory cycles, the mean of endometrial thickness was 7.8 +/- 2.1 mm (3-13 mm) in the follicular phase, 10.4 +/- 1.9 mm (8-13 mm) around ovulation and 10.4 +/- 2.3 mm (8-19 mm) in the luteal phase. The average thickness of endometrium for postmenopausal women without bleeding was 1.4 +/- 0.7 mm (1-5 mm).